Understanding “Now” Doesn’t Exist in Time, How Does That Solve So-Called Biblical Contradictions?

Let’s look at one such set of verse. At the crucifixion, Jesus is talking to one of the criminals hanging on an adjacent cross, Luke 23:43 in the NIV reads “I promise that today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Now compare that to Luke 24:7 in the NIV where we read, “The Son of Man will be handed over to sinners who will nail Him to a cross. But three days later He will rise to life.” Three days later? Of course, this goes with the other three occasions where Jesus had told the disciples what was going to happen, and in each case there was this three day delay in the resurrection. What’s the deal? Is Jesus in Paradise the same day He died or was it three days later? Some believe there was a separation of body and spirit, and the spirit went to Paradise, to “Abraham’s Bosom”. But that doesn’t explain the physical bodily resurrection of Christ three days later. It doesn’t explain Thomas touching His wounds a week later, Jesus eating fish on the beach, or the discussion on the road to Emmaus with the two sad followers. This is a big deal for some; let’s look at the important “Apostle’s Creed”. The Old Roman version (circa 200AD) stated in the fifth section, “The third day He rose again from the dead”; a newer Roman version (circa 700AD), the same version I recited in the Episcopal Church, adopted by Catholics and others, states: ”He descended into hell; the third day He rose again from the dead.” Now, how can this be? How can Jesus be in Paradise the same day He died on the cross for our sins, and suffer separation from the Father, taking our sins upon Him, making them His own and paying the price for three days? One group is likely to say, we believe this way; and another group is just as likely to say, we believe this other way. Depending on their strength and determination, the two groups could soon be at odds with one another, arguments instill, feelings are hurt, and Satan smiles at yet another Christian conflict and a win for his side. Now with your new understanding of time and that “now” doesn’t exist in our linear time experience, plus the fact that we know that Jesus exists in the “now”, we can better understand that both situations are correct at the same time. Jesus is both in Paradise the day He died, plus He experienced the pain and separation from the Father, paying the price for our sins, for three days…all at the same time, all at the same moment.

Understanding "Now" Doesn't Exist in Time, How Does That Solve So-Called Biblical Contradictions?

Let’s look at one such set of verse. At the crucifixion, Jesus is talking to one of the criminals hanging on an adjacent cross, Luke 23:43 in the NIV reads “I promise that today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Now compare that to Luke 24:7 in the NIV where we read, “The Son of Man will be handed over to sinners who will nail Him to a cross. But three days later He will rise to life.” Three days later? Of course, this goes with the other three occasions where Jesus had told the disciples what was going to happen, and in each case there was this three day delay in the resurrection. What’s the deal? Is Jesus in Paradise the same day He died or was it three days later? Some believe there was a separation of body and spirit, and the spirit went to Paradise, to “Abraham’s Bosom”. But that doesn’t explain the physical bodily resurrection of Christ three days later. It doesn’t explain Thomas touching His wounds a week later, Jesus eating fish on the beach, or the discussion on the road to Emmaus with the two sad followers. This is a big deal for some; let’s look at the important “Apostle’s Creed”. The Old Roman version (circa 200AD) stated in the fifth section, “The third day He rose again from the dead”; a newer Roman version (circa 700AD), the same version I recited in the Episcopal Church, adopted by Catholics and others, states: ”He descended into hell; the third day He rose again from the dead.” Now, how can this be? How can Jesus be in Paradise the same day He died on the cross for our sins, and suffer separation from the Father, taking our sins upon Him, making them His own and paying the price for three days? One group is likely to say, we believe this way; and another group is just as likely to say, we believe this other way. Depending on their strength and determination, the two groups could soon be at odds with one another, arguments instill, feelings are hurt, and Satan smiles at yet another Christian conflict and a win for his side. Now with your new understanding of time and that “now” doesn’t exist in our linear time experience, plus the fact that we know that Jesus exists in the “now”, we can better understand that both situations are correct at the same time. Jesus is both in Paradise the day He died, plus He experienced the pain and separation from the Father, paying the price for our sins, for three days…all at the same time, all at the same moment.

Understanding "Now" Doesn't Exist in Time, How Does That Solve So-Called Biblical Contradictions?

Let’s look at one such set of verse. At the crucifixion, Jesus is talking to one of the criminals hanging on an adjacent cross, Luke 23:43 in the NIV reads “I promise that today you will be with Me in Paradise.” Now compare that to Luke 24:7 in the NIV where we read, “The Son of Man will be handed over to sinners who will nail Him to a cross. But three days later He will rise to life.” Three days later? Of course, this goes with the other three occasions where Jesus had told the disciples what was going to happen, and in each case there was this three day delay in the resurrection. What’s the deal? Is Jesus in Paradise the same day He died or was it three days later? Some believe there was a separation of body and spirit, and the spirit went to Paradise, to “Abraham’s Bosom”. But that doesn’t explain the physical bodily resurrection of Christ three days later. It doesn’t explain Thomas touching His wounds a week later, Jesus eating fish on the beach, or the discussion on the road to Emmaus with the two sad followers. This is a big deal for some; let’s look at the important “Apostle’s Creed”. The Old Roman version (circa 200AD) stated in the fifth section, “The third day He rose again from the dead”; a newer Roman version (circa 700AD), the same version I recited in the Episcopal Church, adopted by Catholics and others, states: ”He descended into hell; the third day He rose again from the dead.” Now, how can this be? How can Jesus be in Paradise the same day He died on the cross for our sins, and suffer separation from the Father, taking our sins upon Him, making them His own and paying the price for three days? One group is likely to say, we believe this way; and another group is just as likely to say, we believe this other way. Depending on their strength and determination, the two groups could soon be at odds with one another, arguments instill, feelings are hurt, and Satan smiles at yet another Christian conflict and a win for his side. Now with your new understanding of time and that “now” doesn’t exist in our linear time experience, plus the fact that we know that Jesus exists in the “now”, we can better understand that both situations are correct at the same time. Jesus is both in Paradise the day He died, plus He experienced the pain and separation from the Father, paying the price for our sins, for three days…all at the same time, all at the same moment.

December 26, Christmas is never over – Who is your Truth in the next 364 days?

 

 

Do you know anyone who has ever questioned their faith? Or have you ever known of a church fight over doctrine? Or maybe a denomination that believes it is the only RIGHT denomination, and all others are going to hell? Have you ever known of a particular congregation that believes it has all the right answers and is willing to fight all others who believe differently? While I am all for “keeping the faith” and being solid in my beliefs, it is arrogant to think that “we” have all the right answers. Further, it is not God’s way for us to tear down someone else because they don’t believe as we do; let the other religions (beside Christianity) do that. Are Christians weak, no, they are to be humble because we are not perfect and we don’t have all the right answers…for we “know in part and prophesy in part” (I Cor. 13:9 NIV). I know a man that once hung on a cruel bloody timber that once said, “They know not what they are doing” (Luke 23:34 NIV).

 Somehow making this standard response, saying, nobody has all the answers…so don’t worry about it, just doesn’t cut it; it just doesn’t help, does it? The wars between people and between denominations still go on. People are hurt; why are Christians (in name only) so mean to one another? We are to tell of the love of Jesus Christ, yet we often display the same hatred found out beyond the church walls; nonbelievers see it and say, just look at those hypocrites, as if there are no hypocrites where those outsiders are standing! At least we Christians know we need a Savior and forgiveness of our sins.

Yes, there are really two Christian groups…Christians in name only (see Matthew 7:21) and Christians that are “a new creation in Christ” (John 3:3-7). We are to love one another. Everyone takes a stand on something, and we should. This is not bad, but please know that you only have partial truths and this should impact how you treat others. The Apostle Paul said that “We don’t know everything, and our prophecies are not complete.” (1Cor. 13:9 LB). I’m not suggesting you cave-in to false religions and doctrine, oh no, we are to be willing to stand in the breach and Truth will come to us (John 16:13). But what I am suggesting is that you are to become a strong Christian, set for you a firm foundation in Jesus, and then stand upright secure in your beliefs that Jesus Christ is LORD. Let the Holy Spirit do your fighting and you be loving to all as Jesus was and still is. Jesus tells us to love our enemies (Matt 5:44 NIV), yet the churches hurt their own brothers and sisters (they hardly being enemies) over these partial understandings.

Should we then stop from searching for a higher understanding? Never! The Apostle Paul once said, “I struggle for what is ahead, I run toward the goal, so that I can win the prize of being called to heaven. (Phil 3:13+14 LB)”. My main point is…it is “how” we run the race, not “should” we run the race. We have just celebrated the birth of the Christ Child, Immanuel…how are you now going to live in the next 364 days…for yourself or for that Baby, God incarnate?